Monthly Archives: February 2012

80s 24 Hour Party People

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Above is the trailor for 24 Hour Party People. The British film about Manchester music scene from the mid-late seventies to the early nineties, through the eyes of the legend behind the scene, Tony Wilson and the other major Factory artists like Joy Division, New Order and the Happy Mondays. It begins with the Punk Rock era, and moves through the 1980s into the “Madchester” scene of the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Referencing 80’s:

24 Hour Party People Trailer – YouTube . 2012. 24 Hour Party People Trailer – YouTube . [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1Qz2x94q6A&feature=player_embedded

OVERKAST *visual playlist. 2012. OVERKAST *visual playlist. [ONLINE] Available at: http://overkast.tumblr.com/

24 Hour Party People, 2002. [DVD] Michael Winterbottom, Chester, England: Revolution Films.

Originals, NME, 2002. Madchester. 1st ed. Chester: NME Originals Series.

The Blitz Club – Steve Strange And Rusty Egan Present the Official Blitz Club Website. 2012. The Blitz Club – Steve Strange And Rusty Egan Present the Official Blitz Club Website. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.theblitzclub.com/.

Blitz Kids – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. 2012. Blitz Kids – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. [ONLINE] Available at:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blitz_Kids.

Kibble-White, G, 2005. Tv Cream: The Ultimate Guide to 70s and 80s Pop Culture. 1st ed. USA: Virgin Books.

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80s The Blitz Kids

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The Blitz club, http://www.theblitzclub.com

The Blitz nightclub in Convent Garden, London, frequented by a group of youngsters in the very early 1980s named The Blitz Kids. They were credited with launching the New Romantic cultural movement. The club was known for its outrageous style of clothes and make-up for both sexes and was also a birth place of several pop groups.

Some of the names of the Blitz:

– Steve Strange

– Boy George

– Marilyn

– Alice Temple

– Perri Lister

– Princess Julia

Billy’s club, www.urban75.org/london/gossips-club-london

After beginning at Billy’s nightclub in the late 1970s, the Blitz Kids found themselves bored with the whole punk genre with Billy’s beginning to have regular Roxy Music and David Bowie nights.  In an effort to find something new, they took to wearing bizarre home-made costumes and clothing and excessive amounts of make-up, presenting a highly androgynous appearance. As the group moved on from Billy’s to the more elitist “Blitz” club, this was widely considered to be the birth of the New Romanticism movement.

70s Presentation

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Here is a link to my presentation on the 70s,

along with music and Video.

Referencing 70s:

10 Unusual Japanese Fashions and Subcultures. 2012. 10 Unusual Japanese Fashions and Subcultures. [ONLINE] Available at:http://listverse.com/2009/04/20/10-unusual-japanese-fashions-and-subcultures/.

Wikipedia, ensiklopedia bebas. 2012. Wikipedia, ensiklopedia bebas. [ONLINE] Available at: http://ms.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laman_Utama.

Tokyo Day 6 Part 1 — Takeshita Dori, Harajuku. 2012. Tokyo Day 6 Part 1 — Takeshita Dori, Harajuku. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.maridari.com/2007/11/28/tokyo-day-6-part-1-takeshita-dori-harajuku/.

Northern soul – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. 2012. Northern soul – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. [ONLINE] Available at:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_soul.

Brown, T, 2010. The Wigan Casino Years: Northern Soul the Essential Story 1973-81. 1st ed. UK: AAOS.

Northern Soul, 2012. [DVD] Elaine Constantine, UK: Stubborn Heart Productions.

70s Takenokozoku

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‘Bamboo Shoot Tribe’

Some of the first to form Harajuku into one of the best known places to view Japanese street fashion.

The style was popular in the late 70’s and early 80s, and consisted of neon colored accessories such as beads, whistles, bows, and nametags.

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A store called Takenoko inspired the clothes worn by the Takenokozoku, which were influence by traditional Japanese fashion. The store is still open now, but has evolved with the times.

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Their outfits were loose and baggy, and usually hot pink or bright blue or purple.

They wore robes with kanji characters, and slippers that were comfortable for dancing.

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Large groups of Takenokozoku would choreograph dances in the streets of Harajuku, playing the current popular music on their boom boxes.

70s SUBCULTURES: Takenokozoku/ Northern Soul

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‘Bamboo Shoot Tribe’

Some of the first to form Harajuku into one of the best known places to view Japanese street fashion.

The style was popular in the late 70’s and early 80s, and consisted of neon colored accessories such as beads, whistles, bows, and nametags.

********

A store called Takenoko inspired the clothes worn by the Takenokozoku, which were influence by traditional Japanese fashion. The store is still open now, but has evolved with the times.

********

Their outfits were loose and baggy, and usually hot pink or bright blue or purple.

They wore robes with kanji characters, and slippers that were comfortable for dancing.

********

Large groups of Takenokozoku would choreograph dances in the streets of Harajuku, playing the current popular music on their boom boxes.

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Northern Soul was 1972’s only true underground cult.

Music and dance movement that emerged from the British Mod scene.

Obsessed with exclusiveness.

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Preferred black music over white.

Based on the heavy beat and fast tempo of the mid-1960s Tamla Motown sound, yet usually not the mainstream Motown Records. The recordings most prized by enthusiasts of the genre are usually by lesser-known artists, and were initially released only in limited numbers, often by small regional United States labels such as Ric-Tic and Golden World (Detroit), Mirwood (Los Angeles) and Shout and Okeh (New York/Chicago).

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Cited by many as being a significant step towards the creation of contemporary club culture/Superstar DJ culture of the 2000s.

Two of the most notable DJs from the original northern soul era are Russ Winstanley and Ian Levine.

As in contemporary club culture, northern soul DJs built up a following based on satisfying the crowd’s desires for music that they could not hear anywhere else

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Dress Code.

Included strong elements of the classic mod style, such as button-down Ben Sherman shirts, blazers with centre vents and unusual numbers of buttons, Trickers and Brogue shoes and shrink-to-fit Levi jeans.

Some non-mod items, such as bowling shirts, were also popular.

Later, they started to wear light and loose-fitting clothing for reasons of practicality. This included high-waisted, baggy Oxford trousers and sports vests. These were often covered with sew-on badges representing soul club memberships.

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The clenched fist symbol that has become associated with the northern soul movement (frequently depicted on sew-on patches) emanates from the Black Power Civil Rights movement of the 1960s in the United States.

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The dress to  preserve the cult’s invisibility. To anyone else, the northern mod’s appearance would seem commendably conformist, or only mildly eccentric.

The details only signified to fellow insiders: The vent, The turn-up, The right-button fastened, The curl of the sideburn.

TIBIFALL12’beatlesinspired’

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“Said to be inspired by the era of The Beatles, Amy Smilovic added a 60s twist to her fall collection for Tibi. Rich textures in deep, dark colors – emerald greens, cobalt blues, and burgundys took shape in structured coats, cropped menswear suits, slouchy sweaters, turtlenecks layered under dresses, and pencil skirts. Dresses and blouses in cream fabrics and delicate prints added femininity and grace. The makeup and hair was strong with teased ponytails, full brows, dewy cheeks, matte lips and opaque white nails”Image

Referencing:

Inspiration | Tibi. 2012. Inspiration | Tibi. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.tibi.com/blog/2012/02/14/inspiration/.

Tibi Fall 2012 – Honestly WTF. 2012. Tibi Fall 2012 – Honestly WTF. [ONLINE] Available at: http://honestlywtf.com/collections/tibi-fall-2012/.

60s Presentation

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Here’s is a link to my presentation on 60s subcultures.

Includes music relating to subcultures.

Referencing 60s:

 Quadrophenia (1979) Movie Trailer – YouTube . 2012. Quadrophenia (1979) Movie Trailer – YouTube . [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xwp5Fu2KZsc&feature=player_embedded.

Quadrophenia, 1979. [DVD] Franc Roddam, East Sussex: The Who Films.

1960s Sindy Dolls. 2012. 1960s Sindy Dolls. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.petradolls.co.uk/sindy_information_page_1960s_dolls.htm.

Crazyfads.com – Crazyfads.com – Fads of the 1960s. 2012. Crazyfads.com – Crazyfads.com – Fads of the 1960s. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.crazyfads.com/60s.htm.

 The Temptations – The Movie Part 4 – YouTube . 2012. The Temptations – The Movie Part 4 – YouTube . [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7qnPgF7P38&feature=player_embedded.

The Temptations, 1998. [DVD] Allan Arkush, USA: De Passe Entertainment.

The Five Heartbeats, 1991. [DVD] Robert Townsend, Los Angeles: Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.

The 60s Official Site Juke Box Page – Motown of the 60s. 2012. The 60s Official Site Juke Box Page – Motown of the 60s. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.the60sofficialsite.com/jukebox/Motown-of-the-60s.html.